New viruses discovered! What does that mean for your facility?

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Tuesday, June 11 | Time: 16:30 - 18:00

New viruses discovered!

What does that mean for your facility?

Learn all about them in Prague at FELASA 2019

OB15S3

Mouse Kidney Parvovirus

A newly characterized parvoviral pathogen of research mice

Abstract below

OB15S5

Zebrafish Picornavirus

Surveillance for a novel viral pathogen of laboratory zebrafish

Abstract below


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Speaker: Cindy Besch-Williford

Date: Tuesday, 11 June.

Time: 16:30 - 18:00

Location: CLUB C, Clinical Club Goes Viral

Mouse Kidney Parvovirus: A newly characterized parvoviral pathogen of research mice

Cindy Besch-Williford, M. Crim, M. Hart and R. Livingston

IDEXX BioAnalytics, Columbia, United States

Abstract

For decades, a nephropathy of unknown etiology caused tubular epithelial intranuclear inclusions in kidneys of immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. Recently, the etiology of this condition was identified as a parvovirus of the chapparvovirus genus. Divergent genetically from the murine parvoviruses MVM and MPV, this new virus was named Mouse Kidney Parvovirus (MKPV). MKPV replicates in the kidney, and is detected in blood, kidney, and urine of infected mice. Due to voiding habits of mice, MKPV is also found in feces collected from the cage. Infection in immunocompromised mice is persistent, causing progressive renal damage, while infection in immunocompetent mice appears to be transient once an antibody response is generated. Virus can be transmitted horizontally by housing naïve mice on virus-contaminated soiled bedding or with infected mice. Viral transmission can also occur by passage of MKPV-contaminated xenografts and biological materials. Diagnostic tests include PCR of kidney, feces collected from soiled bedding, environmental samples (cage swabs and rack exhaust filters) or biological materials. Virus-infected research mice have been found globally and the prevalence of MKPV, as tested by PCR from samples received in our laboratory, is about 12%. Inclusion of MKPV in health monitoring and biologic material testing is recommended to prevent use of infected mice or mouse-passaged biologics in research investigations.

Zebrafish Picornavirus: Surveillance for a novel viral pathogen of laboratory zebrafish

M. Crim, Cindy Besch-Williford, M. Hart and R. Livingston

IDEXX BioAnalytics, Columbia, United States

Abstract

Subclinical infections of research animals can add confounding variability in animal studies and have the potential to alter experimental outcomes. Zebrafish picornavirus 1 (ZfPV-1) is a recently discovered novel picornavirus that subclinically infects laboratory zebrafish. ZfPV-1 replicates in the enteric mucosa and transmission is presumed to be fecal-oral, which is a common mode of transmission among picornaviruses. While the virus can be detected in clinically normal zebrafish, the impact of infection on the zebrafish immune system, gut development, microbiome, and other research areas remain unknown. Health monitoring data from zebrafish colonies indicate that the virus is prevalent, with 24% of samples testing positive to date, and widely distributed among research institutions in Europe and North America. ZfPV-1 can be detected by real-time PCR in a wide variety of sample types, including environmental samples, feces, embryos (presumably reflecting fecal contamination), and whole frozen zebrafish. Fecal samples, which are sensitive for viral detection, can be easily collected from small groups of adult zebrafish and are useful as an antemortem test for valuable zebrafish lines or fish held in quarantine. To prevent potential adverse impacts on research from an unrecognized viral infection, inclusion of ZfPV-1 is recommended for colony health monitoring and quarantine testing.